FILE - In this Nov. 14, 2017, file photo, Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. Opponents call the estate tax the "death tax" and say it taxes someone twice, first when they earn the money and again after they die. Ryan, one who has long argued for eliminating the tax, called this "unfair"and said in a recent interview with Fox News that the government shouldn't stop people from passing their life's work to their kids. He and other opponents of the tax say it also inhibits job growth because it kills small businesses. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

FILE - In this Nov. 14, 2017, file photo, Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. Opponents call the estate tax the "death tax" and say it taxes someone twice, first when they earn the money and again after they die. Ryan, one who has long argued for eliminating the tax, called this "unfair"and said in a recent interview with Fox News that the government shouldn't stop people from passing their life's work to their kids. He and other opponents of the tax say it also inhibits job growth because it kills small businesses. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

All about the estate tax debate

By SARAH SKIDMORE SELL The Associated Press
This article was published December 3, 2017 at 4:00 a.m.

The estate tax affects a very small -- and very wealthy -- number of Americans.

This story is only available from our archives.

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