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October 17, 2018
FILE - This photo posted on a file sharing website Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2017, by the Islamic State Group in Sinai, a militant organization, shows a deadly attack by militants on an Egyptian police checkpoint, in el-Arish, north Sinai, Egypt. The Egypt mosque massacre could point to the rise of an ultra-extremist faction that is so radical in its readiness to kill fellow Muslims that it has caused rifts within the Islamic State group _ already notorious for its atrocities. (Islamic State Group in Sinai via AP, File )

FILE - This photo posted on a file sharing website Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2017, by the Islamic State Group in Sinai, a militant organization, shows a deadly attack by militants on an Egyptian police checkpoint, in el-Arish, north Sinai, Egypt. The Egypt mosque massacre could point to the rise of an ultra-extremist faction that is so radical in its readiness to kill fellow Muslims that it has caused rifts within the Islamic State group _ already notorious for its atrocities. (Islamic State Group in Sinai via AP, File )

Egypt massacre in Sinai may point to an even more bloody IS

By MAGGIE MICHAEL HAMZA HENDAWI The Associated Press
This article was published December 3, 2017 at 4:00 a.m.

CAIRO -- The massacre of more than 300 worshippers at a mosque in Egypt's Sinai crossed a new line -- even by militants' brutal standards -- and could be a sign the Islamic State group is trying to make up for the loss of its "caliphate" in Iraq and Syria or that an even more ultra-extremist faction is rising in power.

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