In this Feb. 25, 2014, photo, Little Falls, Minn., resident Jamie Houdek, with his wife, Lisa, at his side, talks about his recovery after he lost his right hand to a corn picker in November 2013 on the 60-acre hobby farm where he raises beef cattle. The nation's growing embrace of small-scale production of local and organic crops is leading to more farm injuries and deaths among amateur growers. Experts say some novices have little appreciation of the occupation's dangers. (Kimm Anderson /St. Cloud Times via AP)

In this Feb. 25, 2014, photo, Little Falls, Minn., resident Jamie Houdek, with his wife, Lisa, at his side, talks about his recovery after he lost his right hand to a corn picker in November 2013 on the 60-acre hobby farm where he raises beef cattle. The nation's growing embrace of small-scale production of local and organic crops is leading to more farm injuries and deaths among amateur growers. Experts say some novices have little appreciation of the occupation's dangers. (Kimm Anderson /St. Cloud Times via AP)

Rise of 'hobby farms' means more growers get maimed, killed

By RICK CALLAHAN The Associated Press
This article was published December 3, 2017 at 4:00 a.m.

INDIANAPOLIS -- Phil Jacobs was just a teenager when his parents bought a scenic Kentucky farm with hayfields, forests, creeks, trails and a view of the Ohio River. Decades later, he still spent time there, maintaining the property as a second job and using its campsite for family getaways.

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