The Associated Press SEXUAL HARASSMENT: Steve Wyard, a sales associate for a large company that supplies industrial washers and dryers to apartments and other businesses, poses for a photo at the company's headquarters in the Van Nuys area of Los Angeles Monday, Dec. 4, 2017. Wyard says he can't recall anyone bringing a sexual harassment complaint during his long career at his company. He thought he knew what sexual harassment looked like: a classic put-out-or-lose-your-job overture. Now he's not so sure. (AP Photo/Amanda Lee Myers)

The Associated Press SEXUAL HARASSMENT: Steve Wyard, a sales associate for a large company that supplies industrial washers and dryers to apartments and other businesses, poses for a photo at the company's headquarters in the Van Nuys area of Los Angeles Monday, Dec. 4, 2017. Wyard says he can't recall anyone bringing a sexual harassment complaint during his long career at his company. He thought he knew what sexual harassment looked like: a classic put-out-or-lose-your-job overture. Now he's not so sure. (AP Photo/Amanda Lee Myers)

In wake of Weinstein, men wonder if hugging women still OK

By JOHN ROGERS The Associated Press
This article was published December 5, 2017 at 4:00 a.m.

LOS ANGELES-- Steve Wyard thought he knew what sexual harassment looked like: a put-out-or-lose-your-job overture. Now he's not so sure.

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