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December update: Use capital losses to offset capital gains and accelerate your property tax deduction to reduce your tax bill.

Use capital losses to offset capital gains

When is a loss actually a gain? When that loss becomes an opportunity to lower tax liability, of course. Now's a good time to begin your year-end tax planning and attempt to neutralize gains and losses by year end. To do so, it might make sense to sell investments at a loss in 2018 to offset capital gains that you've already realized this year.

Now and later

A capital loss occurs when you sell a security for less than your "basis," generally the original purchase price. You can use capital losses to offset any capital gains you realize in that same tax year -- even if one is short-term and the other is long term.

When your capital losses exceed your capital gains, you can use up to $3,000 of the excess to offset wages, interest and other ordinary income ($1,500 for married people filing separately) and carry the remainder forward to future years until it's used up.

Research and replace

Years ago, investors realized it could be beneficial to sell a security to recognize a capital loss for a given tax year and then -- if they still liked the security's prospects -- buy it back immediately. To counter this strategy, Congress imposed the wash sale rule, which disallows losses when an investor sells a security and then buys the same or a "substantially identical" security within 30 days of the sale, before or after.

Waiting 30 days to repurchase a security you've sold might be fine in some situations. But there may be times when you'd rather not be forced to sit on the sidelines for a month.

Fortunately, there's an alternative. With a little research, you might be able to identify a security in the same sector you like just as well as, or better than, the old one. Your solution is now simple and straightforward: Simultaneously sell the stock you own at a loss and buy the competitor's stock, thereby avoiding violation of the "same or substantially identical" provision of the wash sale rule. You maintain your position in that sector or industry and might even add to your portfolio a stock you believe has more potential or less risk.

If you bought shares of a security at different times, give some thought to which lot can be sold most advantageously. The IRS allows investors to choose among several methods of designating lots when selling securities, and those methods sometimes produce radically different results.

Good with the bad

Investing always carries the risk that you will lose some or even all of your money. But you have to take the good with the bad. In terms of tax planning, you can turn investment losses into opportunities -- and potentially end the year on a high note.

Accelerating property tax

deduction to reduce tax bill

Smart timing of deductible expenses can reduce your tax liability, and poor timing can increase it unnecessarily. One deductible expense you may be able to control to your advantage is your property tax payment.

You can prepay (by December 31) property taxes that relate to 2018 (the taxes must be assessed in 2018) but that are due in 2019, and deduct the payment on your return for this year. But you generally can't prepay property taxes that relate to 2019 (they must be assessed in 2019) and deduct the payment on this year's return. Also, beware of the dollar-amount limitation discussed below.

A big decision

Accelerating deductible expenses such as property tax payments is typically beneficial. Prepaying your property tax may be especially advantageous if your tax rate under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) is expected to decrease in the next year. Deductions save more tax when tax rates are higher.

But not every tax rate has dropped for the 2018 tax year under the TCJA -- the very lowest rate, 10 percent, has been retained, as well as the 35 percent rate (though the income brackets for these rates have changed). So, some taxpayers may not save any more by prepaying. Also, taxpayers who expect to substantially increase their income next year, pushing them into a higher tax bracket, may benefit by not prepaying their property tax bill.

Another important point is that, under the TCJA, for tax years 2018 through 2025 the itemized deduction for all state and local taxes is limited to $10,000 ($5,000 for married filing separately).

More considerations

Property tax isn't deductible for purposes of the alternative minimum tax (AMT). So, if you're subject to the AMT this year, a prepayment may hurt you because you'll lose the benefit of the deduction. Before prepaying your property tax, make sure you aren't at AMT risk for 2018.

Also, don't forget that, for 2018 to 2025, the TCJA suspends personal itemized exemptions but roughly doubles the standard deduction amounts (for 2018) to $12,000 for singles and separate filers, $18,000 for heads of households, and $24,000 for joint filers. This may affect your decision on whether to prepay.

Specific strategies

Not sure whether you should prepay your property tax bill or what other deductions you might be able to accelerate into 2018 (or should consider deferring to 2019)? Contact us. We can help you determine your optimal year-end tax planning strategies.

To learn more, contact Prince & Tuohey CPA Ltd., 2836 Malvern Ave. Suite D, Hot Springs, AR 71901. Call 501-262-5500 or visit website http://www.princetuohey.com for more information.

Business on 12/10/2018

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