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Statue should move

Dear editor:

As the granddaughter of a soldier in the Civil War on the losing side, I heartily support moving the statue erected in 1934 by the United Daughters of the Confederacy to another location. Yes, you read that right. I'm a granddaughter of a "Johnny Reb."

Although I am not a member of a longtime "prominent" family, my husband's father was born in Little Rock in 1892 and grew up in Hot Springs from 1900 to 1910. I was married to his son for 60 years before Bob's death here on New Year's Day in 2012. Our four children were born in four different states, ending up in Hot Springs where all 13 grandchildren were reared. Bob and I followed in 1998 and they could not have chosen a better town for our retirement.

Removing the Confederate flag from the statue's site recently was not enough -- the statue should be in a more appropriate location than the entrance to downtown Hot Springs where two lynchings took place in the 1920s. UDC, you have the power to relocate the Confederate statue and deed the land back to the city of Hot Springs from whence it came.

Please search your hearts and do the right thing, I implore you.

Wanda Sanders Bodemann

Hot Springs

One person's rights

Dear editor:

Where do one person's rights end and another person's rights begin? My ex-neighbor decided to rent his house for the weekend. That is certainly his right. He advertised the rental on Airbnb, saying in part, "The neighbors are quiet. On one side is a retired couple who are frequently on trips. On the other side is a home used as a vacation home by a doctor from out of town." I am part of the retired couple frequently out of town (nice information for criminals who would like to break in without being disturbed).

Someone rents the house and decides to have a party on Friday and Saturday night. Again, that is their right. Several hundred people showed up each night, parking up and down my street (a one-lane dead-end street with seven houses) and two adjacent streets. Cars were parked in my yard and driveway because I was not here to prevent it. The police were called several times by many neighbors complaining of blocked access, noise, trash, etc. I called to have the police get the cars off my property. I was told they could not do that. The police suggested that I call a tow truck, which I did. The tow truck driver explained that I had to be at the property to sign paperwork in order to protect him. It seems I was out of legal options since I was out of town. I did call my ex-neighbor, left a message for him, and still have not heard back from him.

Thank goodness for my neighbors who cleaned up my yard and driveway both days. They picked up liquor bottles, beer cans, cigarette and cigar butts and wrappers, a bag of marijuana, and six empty 9-mm shell casings.

The lesson I learned is there is no protection for my property if I am out of town. So, where do my rights begin?

Mike Morrison

Hot Springs

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